Friday, April 20, 2012

Dang, I'm good! (with a little help)

As a photographer, you always take credit for your work. Back when we shot film, you never gave the lab credit for your great shot. But without them processing your film, you don't have a great shot. Today is much the same. "Why, yes, I shot that photo. Yes, it is great. Thank you." Meanwhile, here in my studio, Jack and Shelley are laboring away in the Digital Dungeon making me look really good.

Here are some recent examples of things that turned out great, and I said 'why thank you' when complemented. Well, it wasn't just me.

this was shot for a new client, a major museum.  It's a painting, that is 10'x10', it hangs in the stairwell at the Museum. This is how it looked when we first photographed it. Yep, that's the top of a train signpost in the middle of the painting. You can get an idea of the size of the painting by looking at Calieb's hand holding the color checker on the lower left.

It was a challenge, but this is the final image and it is a very accurate copy of the original painting. I moved the camera to the left and did a second image to show Shelley what the sign was blocking. She combined the two images and retouched out the post. Again, I took all the credit!


Same client. This time we photographed two larger than life size sculptures of a horse on location in the Museum. We shot it on a white seamless. Then the client asked me if we could provide a clipping path so, they could put it on different backgrounds. I said, " sure, that's no problem".

This is the raw file. We shot several angles of two different horses. They ended up asking for eight finished images.

This is the final image of one angle. The clipping path on this one horse took over ten hours to complete.


Here is a close-up, so that you can see the intricacies of the clipping path.

               
Thanks go out to Shelley Jackson and Jack White who spend a bunch of hours making me look really good. 

Not all of our images require this much retouching. The following are some complicated photos that had just a minimum of retouching.